Lecture 14: Modern History II “Light and Shadow in an Industrial City: The Back-Alley Tenements of Nipponbashi”

Hero Image: 『写真で見る大阪市100年』、大阪都市協会
(Osaka City 100 years in Pictures, Osaka City Association)

Introduction

Hello again. I’m Saga Ashita from Osaka City University.

In today’s class, we’re going to see how local people’s daily lives changed as Osaka developed into an industrial city with the steady advance of modernization and capitalism during the Meiji period. While industrialization made Osaka into a metropolis of a million people, disparities deepened and the masses faced lives of poverty. Let’s take a concrete look at actual living conditions during this period of industrialization, from the Meiji to Taisho periods, by “anatomizing” the structure of daily life and work in a block of tenements around Nipponbashi.

1. A City of a Million: The Industrialization of Osaka

First let’s look at the population trends in urban Osaka during the Meiji period. It’s estimated that the city’s population peaked in the second half of the eighteenth century (i.e., mid-Edo period) at around 420,000 and declined thereafter, reaching about 280,000 by the first year of Meiji (1868). As I discussed in the last lecture, with the move of the national capital to Tokyo and the abolition of silver currency, Osaka’s economy slumped and the population remained stagnant even into the 1870s. However, migration to cities increased from the 1880s, when rural areas suffered a serious recession due to the government policy of fiscal austerity known as the Matsukata Deflation. This was also a time when new enterprises, in the form of modern joint-stock companies, proliferated in sectors like rail and textiles. Urban Osaka’s economy finally started to grow and, as a result, the population began to increase steadily.

In 1889, with the implementation of the new system of administrative divisions (shisei-chōsonsei), Osaka City was established as an entity encompassing the four “wards” (ku) that made up the urban area. The Osaka City of the time was much smaller than today—falling well within the circle drawn by Japan’s Rail’s current Osaka Loop Line—but it had a population of over 500,000 by 1896. Osaka’s population growth actually slowed slightly during the 1890s, which is likely explained by the fact that the central urban area was already saturated.

On the other hand, in Nishinari-gun and Higashinari-gun, the counties that surrounded the city, the population increased virtually without interruption from 1880 through the 1890s. Again, this was probably because rural migrants had nowhere to settle in the saturated central areas.

Population of Osaka City and Surrounding Countries (1884-1896)
Year Osaka City Nishinari County Higashinari County Sumiyoshi County Total
1884 355,844 127,198 52,698 28,486 564,226
1887 426,846 135,484 58,566 29,425 650,321
1890 476,392 154,353 69,312 29,875 729,932
1893 484,130 167,034 76,765 30,233 758,162
1896 504,285 197,170 126,937 828,392
Quoted from New Edition Osaka City History Vol. 5, The Office of the Editor for Osaka City History

In other words, outward urbanization (i.e., the phenomenon of “sprawl”) began from the 1880s as new sites for factories and accompanying workers’ tenements were constructed on the outskirts of the urban nucleus.

In 1897, Osaka undertook its first revision of the city limits. This was prompted by de facto, accretionary expansion of the urban area, which proceeded variously through the inflow of population attracted to the growing crust of companies and factories constructed around the old city, as well as through continuous infrastructural development (beginning with the construction of a new port). As if to chase after the social and economic shadow the city cast beyond its actual administrative limits, the expansion was carried out to secure a bigger tax income and strengthen the city’s financial base. The city’s population jumped to 750,000 as a result of this first revision, and as industrialization sharply intensified during the beginning of the twentieth century, Osaka finally developed into a megacity of a million people.

To sum up, Osaka matured into a modern metropolis in terms of both size and structure due the advance of industrialization and urban development from 1880 through the early 1900s.

2. 1880s Tenement Districts

Now let’s start looking at the real conditions of life during the period of industrialization through the example of Nipponbashi. Broadly, we can say that it was over the second half of the nineteenth century, from the final years of the Edo period through late Meiji, that the “tenement districts” (nagamachi) of the city’s lower classes transformed into modern slums.

The tenement districts were parts of the city where, beginning in the Edo period, the many poor classes of day laborers had become concentrated. They dwelt in “wood-rent lodges” (kichinyado), cheap, bare-bones accommodations where the room fees were about the same price as some firewood (hence the name). Even after the Meiji Restoration these areas continued to be dominated by rows of these back-alley tenements. They were divided into single rooms for rent by the day (hibarai) and inhabited by day laborers and other members of the lower classes such as beggars.

In 1887, a now famous piece of documentary journalism was serialized in the Jiji shinpō newspaper under the title “Observations of the Pauper Hovels of Nagomachi.”

Made by Ashita Saga based on “Observations of the Nagomachi-chō Poor”

The author, a man named Suzuki Umeshirō, had taken it upon himself to investigate life in a tenement district. According to this mid-Meiji source, the occupations of the tenement classes could be broken down more or less as follows: 1) umbrella and fan makers, 2) day laborers like rickshaw men, etc., 3) salvagers and beggars, i.e., the very lowest classes, 4) various entertainers, 5) petty street vendors, and, finally, 6) modern industrial workers (in match factories, etc.). Notably, the lowest of the low (salvagers, etc.) made up a large proportion of the area’s inhabitants, but the number of industrial workers was on the rise. For at this time the umbrellas and other petty wares, along with new products from the factories proliferating around the tenement districts, made up part of Japan’s exports to China and Southeast Asia. The lower classes of Osaka were, therefore, swallowed up in the Asia-wide wave of industrialization and economic change.

Another important aspect of life in the tenement districts was how landlords and other rentiers had, since the Edo period, affixed themselves to the lower classes through daily room rentals, pawnshops, and moneylending. While they did provide the lower classes with lodging and introduce them to employers, there were also operators who not only extracted comparatively high rents, but lent money at usurious rates, rented bedding and mosquito nets, and sold crude meals and sundries.

With the progress of modernization, however, the financial burdens on the landlords increased. (For example, through the imposition of fees to run local schools.) What was more, severe cholera epidemics swept Osaka in the 1870s and 1880s, hitting the Nipponbashi area hard. Extracting rents from the lower classes therefore became less enormously profitable than it once had been, and there came calls, citing hygienic concerns, for the demolition or relocation of the slums where the poor were concentrated. As a result, various problems emerged around the issue of relocation, for instance in 1886, when the Osaka government tried to demolish the city’s slums and make the lower class residents relocate outside the urban area. The plan encountered resistance from the landowners of Namba village, the proposed destination for displaced residents, and wasn’t carried out as intended. In the end, though, a “slum clearance” was effected in 1891 through a large-scale demolition and reconstruction of the city’s back-alley tenements, which brought an end to the early modern structure of lower-class society and the daily rentals that had served as its nucleus. However, it turned out that driving people out of these areas simply served to scatter them to others such as the side streets east and west of Nipponbashi or southwest to Kamagasaki. As Osaka continued to grow, so would the slums.

 From the 1890s, new tenements were built as small to mid-size petty manufacturing grew up in the side streets east and west of Nipponbashi Boulevard (Nipponbashi-suji, today Sakai-suji), producing a mixed residential-industrial townscape. On the other hand, in the southwest of the tenement district (Kamagasaki) a new type of “wood-rent lodge” was being constructed in large numbers: the ground floor rooms were occupied by the owners, while many men lived together in large rooms on the second. Spaces called yoseba were also set up, the largest one in Kamagasaki, where day laborers could gather to be selected for jobs, and so the area naturally became a slum made up of single males. This was what sowed the seeds of the post-World War II “Kamagasaki Troubles”, a series of riots fueled by the increased homelessness and crime that came with the hard economic times.

 

3. Taisho-Period “Substandard Housing Districts”: The Hachijukken Tenements

We can get a sense of life in the slums by looking at the Hachijukken nagaya, a block of tenements which lay just to the east of Nipponbashi Boulevard.

We have a good picture of life in these tenements, which were built in 1890, thanks to a detailed survey carried out by the Osaka City Social Affairs Office in 1924.

504 individuals in 129 households lived in the tenement block’s 79 rental units. With one “main household” (honshotai) per unit, the fifty left over lived as “lodger households” (dōkyo shotai), or subtenants of the main tenants, usually renting out (magari) a unit’s second floor (narrow two-story units were the norm in Osaka).

Plans for the Hachijukken Tenements (八十軒長屋平面図),
quoted from Ashita Saga, Kindai Ōsaka no Toshi Shakai Kōzō, Nihon Keizai Hyōronsya
(『近代大阪の都市社会構造』, The Structure of Modern Osaka’s Urban Society)

That is to say, most of the apartments in these tenements housed two families, and some as many as three.

About 40% of families in the block had only one room; in terms of area (i.e., regardless of how many rooms), more than 70% had less than 7.5 tatami mats of living space (13.6m2/147 sq. ft). Given that the average family size was approximately four, this was a very high density. With the exception of the block landlord’s household, the remaining 128 tenant families had to share three wells and one faucet with running water. The rental units comprising the block’s most recently built addition each had a toilet—hardly impressive if one knows that these 24 apartments were home to 46 families, but the lap of luxury compared to the tenements’ other 82 families (again excepting the landlord’s), who had to share just two toilets.

Next let’s look at class relationships in the Hachijukken tenements in terms of the land they stood on, the actual buildings, and the residents. The tenement block’s lot was owned by the famous Osaka financial conglomerate (zaibatsu) Sumitomo Kichizaemon. The tenements therefore had a multi-story class structure, with the Sumitomo family at the very top as absentee landlord/landowner; next, the tenant-owner/building landlord (yanushi), who leased the lot from Sumitomo to run his rental business; and finally the “main” and “lodger” households I mentioned before, with the “mains” leasing apartment units directly from the building owner and then renting out space to “lodgers”. The building owner had an income of several hundred yen per month, high for the time, and his personal apartments were large, with a private well and separate connection to the water main—clearly a class apart from his tenants with their monthly incomes of around fifty yen.

Class Structure of Hachijukkenn Nagaya (八十軒長屋の階層構造), quoted from Ashita Saga, Kindai Ōsaka no Toshi Shakai Kōzō, Nihon Keizai Hyōronsya (『近代大阪の都市社会構造』, The Structure of Modern Osaka’s Urban Society)

What about tenants’ occupations? Most household heads worked in salvage, a tradition that extended back to the Edo-period tenement district, but in many cases their children worked in local factories and some were even skilled laborers. In other words, we can see a trend across generations of people rising from the traditional poor classes of day laborers and salvagers to become modern industrial workers.

As I’ll discuss further in the next lecture, Hachijukken and the many other Nipponbashi-area tenement blocks like it became the objects of municipal efforts to improve “substandard housing districts.” This was because local conditions came to be seen as an expression of the problems of urban society, epitomized in poverty and disparity. But at the same time, it is plain that the residents of these areas were also viewed as sources of the labor power that modern industry could not do without. 

Conclusion

What I’ve tried to show today is that, amidst the shadows of Osaka’s industrialization, there is the history of the common people who, crowded into tenement blocks on the urban periphery, supported day-to-day production in the metropolis. By peering where we can through the historical record, we can observe the traces left behind by these people who flowed into Osaka from the end of the nineteenth century, living resolutely in the face of social contradictions made manifest in growing wealth and productive power on the one hand, and deepening disparity and poverty on the other.


第 14 回 近現代史② 「工業都市の光と影―日本橋の裏長屋から」

まえおき

 大阪市立大学の佐賀 朝です。

 この授業では、明治時代の到来によって近代化と資本主義化が進むなか、大阪が工業都市として発展していく状況に触れながら、地域での人々の生活がどのように変化したのか、について見ていきます。工業化によって大阪が百万人の人口を抱える巨大都市になる一方で、庶民の生活は、格差が増大するなかで、貧困と背中合わせの状態にありました。明治時代から大正時代にかけての工業化の時代における庶民生活の実態について、日本橋周辺の、ある長屋の生活や仕事を「解剖」しながら、具体的に見ていきましょう。

1.大阪の工業化と百万都市

 はじめに明治時代の大阪市街地の人口動向について見ましょう。大阪市街地の人口は、江戸時代半ば、18世紀後半の約42万人をピークに、その後は減少を続け、明治元年にあたる1868年には約28万人になったと推定されています。前回の授業で述べたように、東京への遷都や銀目の廃止の悪影響もあって、大阪経済は低迷し、1870年代になっても人口の停滞が続きました。しかし、「松方デフレ」と呼ばれる政府の緊縮財政政策の影響もあって、農村が深刻な不況にあえぐようになった1880年代から、都市への流入人口が増大します。この時期は、鉄道業や紡績業など、近代的な株式会社形態による企業が勃興した時代でもあり、大阪の経済も、この頃には、ようやく上向きになります。その結果、大阪市街地の人口は、順調な増加へと転じたのです。

 そして、1889年には市制・町村制という法律が施行され、大阪市街地の四区を範囲とする大阪市が成立します。当初の大阪市は、現在のJR大阪環状線よりも内側の範囲にとどまる、現在と比べるとずいぶん小さな大阪市ですが、この大阪市の人口は、1896年には、50万人を越えます。じつは、1890年代に入ってからの大阪市の人口増加は、やや鈍っていました。それは、中心市街地の人口がすでに飽和状態にあったためだと考えられます。

 一方で、大阪市を取り巻くように存在していた西成郡・東成郡では、1880から90年代を通じて、ほぼ一貫して増加しました。

大阪市と周辺郡部の人口(1884~96年)
年次 大阪4区 西成郡 東成郡 住吉郡 合計
1884 355,844 127,198 52,698 28,486 564,226
1887 426,846 135,484 58,566 29,425 650,321
1890 476,392 154,353 69,312 29,875 729,932
1893 484,130 167,034 76,765 30,233 758,162
1896 504,285 197,170 126,937 828,392
(出典:『新修大阪市史』第五巻、大阪市史編纂所)

 これは、市街地中心部の人口が飽和したため、周辺部に地方からの移り住む人口が増えたからだと考えられます。1880年代以降、小さな大阪市の外縁部では、新しい工場の立地とそれに伴って長屋などの建設も進んだため、市街地の外延的拡大、すなわち「スプロール化」と呼ばれる現象が始まったのです。

 1897年、大阪市は第一次市域拡張を実施します。これは、旧市街の外縁部に会社・工場が建設され、人口が流入したことや、大阪に新しい港を建設する「築港事業」をはじめとして、都市建設が進展することによって、事実上の市街地が拡大したのをうけてのものです。大阪市は、行政区域を越えて拡張していく社会的・経済的な意味での都市圏の広がりを後追いするかのように、その行政範囲を拡大して税収を確保し、都市自治体としての財政基盤を強化しようと、市域の拡張を行ったのです。この第一次市域拡張の結果、大阪市の人口は75万人に達し、さらに工業化が本格的に進んだ20世紀の初めには、ついに大阪市は100万人の人口を要する大都市に発展しました。

 こうして1880~1900年代における工業化と都市開発の進展によって、大阪は、規模の面でも、構造の面でも近代的な巨大都市に成長しました。

2.1880年代の「長町」

 さて、以下は、この時代の日本橋(にっぽんばし)地域を事例に、工業化時代の庶民生活の実態を見ていきましょう。19世紀の後半は、江戸時代から明治にかけて、都市下層民が集まっていた「長町」(ながまち)と呼ばれる地域が、近代的なスラムへと変容する時期でした。

 長町は、江戸時代から木賃宿(きちんやど)―これは薪代ていどの安い宿賃で泊まれる宿屋ですが―に宿泊するたくさんの日雇いの貧困層が集まる町でした。明治維新後も、日雇いの人たちや、物乞いをするような下層民が集まる「日払い」の裏長屋が並ぶ町でした。

(「名護町貧民窟視察記」に基づき、佐賀朝作成)

 明治時代の半ば、1887年ごろにこの街を探訪した鈴木梅四郎という人が『時事新報』という新聞に連載した「名護町貧民窟視察記」(なごまち ひんみんくつ しさつき)という有名なルポルタージュによると、長町下層民の職業は、だいたい次のようなものに分かれていました。

 第一に、傘や団扇などの職人、第二に、人力車夫など日雇労働者、第三に、屑拾い、乞食などの最下層民、第四に多様な芸能者、第五には、零細な小売商人、そして最後に、マッチなど近代産業の労働者です。屑拾い(くずひろい)など、最底辺の下層民の割合が大きい点に特徴がありましたが、同時に、マッチのような近代産業の労働者も増えつつあった点が注目されます。長町の職人がつくっていた傘や、長町周辺に工場が勃興しつつあったマッチなどの製品は、当時、中国や東南アジアなどに向けて、日本から輸出されていた製品でもあり、こうして大阪の下層民は、アジア規模の工業化や経済変動の波に、巻き込まれつつあったのです。

 さて、長町では江戸時代以来、木賃宿や質屋・金貸しなどを通じて地主・家主たちが下層民に吸着していました。彼らは、下層民に宿を提供し、仕事を仲介する一方、割高な日払い家賃を搾取するだけでなく、高利で金を貸し、布団や蚊帳などもレンタルし、粗末な食事・物品などを販売する業者もいました。

 しかし、近代化に伴う学校経営の資金など、地主たちの負担が増える一方、1870~1880年代には大阪でコレラが大流行し、日本橋周辺では、大きな被害も出ました。そのため、膨大な下層民に吸着する旨味は次第に小さくなり、逆に衛生問題の観点から、貧困者が集まるスラムの解消や移転が叫ばれるようになります。その結果、1886年には「長町貧民移転問題」が発生しました。これは、大阪府が長町の裏長屋を撤去させ、下層民を市街地外へ移転させようとするものでした。この貧民移転は、移転先の難波村(なんばむら)地主たちの反対などもあって、そのままの形では実現しませんでしたが、結局、1891年に裏長屋の大規模な建て替えによる「スラム・クリアランス」が実施され、日払い長屋を中核とした近世的な下層社会は解体することになりました。しかし、この地を追われた下層民は、日本橋の東西の裏通りや、南西部の釜ヶ崎(かまがさき)へと移動・拡散することになり、大阪全体の膨張に伴って、むしろスラムは広がっていくことになります。

 実際、1890年代以降、日本橋筋(現在の堺筋)の東西裏通りの辺りには中小零細工場が集まるとともに、新たな長屋が建設され、「住工混在」の街並みが形成されます。この周辺は、主に家族持ちの都市雑業層と呼ばれる庶民が居住する地域になっていきます。一方、長町南西の釜ヶ崎には、1897年の第一次大阪市域拡張ののち、新しいタイプの木賃宿―一階は家族持ちが住む部屋ですが、二階部分には、たくさんの単身男性を収容する大部屋がありました―が多数、建設されました。釜ヶ崎には、日雇労働者を日々の仕事に周旋する「寄せ場」(よせば)と呼ばれる空間も形成され、次第に単身の日雇労働者が集まるスラムになっていきます。これが、第二次世界大戦後の「釜ヶ崎問題」の起源なのです。

3.大正時代の「不良住宅地区」―八十軒長屋

 日本橋周辺の長屋での暮らしぶりについて、当時、日本橋筋の東側の裏手にあった「八十軒長屋」と呼ばれる長屋を取り上げて、その様子を見ましょう。

 1890年代に建設された、この「八十軒長屋」には、少し後になりますが、1924年の時点で大阪市社会部が実施した詳細な調査があり、その生活の様子がよく分かります。

八十軒長屋の平面図(出典:佐賀朝『近代大阪の都市社会構造』、日本経済評論社)

 この長屋には、79戸に129世帯504人の住民が住んでいました。129世帯から戸数にあたる79世帯を差し引いた50世帯は、借家の借り主―これを「本所帯」(ほんしょたい)と言います―に同居させてもらっている「同居世帯」(どうきょしょたい)で、多くは二階建ての住戸の二階部分を「間借り」(まがり)する形で住んでいました。

 つまり、長屋の住戸の多くは、2世帯が同居、多い場合には3世帯が同居していたのです。

 1世帯が使用する部屋数は、全体の4割近くが1部屋のみで、畳数では、7畳半以下が全体の7割以上を占めました。家族人数の平均はだいたい4人でしたから、かなりの高密度だったことがわかります。そして、井戸と上水道は、家主を除く128世帯が井戸3つと水道栓1つを共用していました。便所は、79戸のうち、新しく建てられた部分である24戸――ここには46世帯が住んでいたのですが―には各1か所あったのですが、家主を除けば、残りは2か所の共同便所を、じつに82もの世帯が共用する状態でした。

 次に、八十軒長屋の土地・家屋・居住をめぐる階層関係を見ましょう。じつは、長屋が建つ敷地は、大阪の有名な財閥である住友吉左衛門の所有地でした。この長屋は、不在地主である住友家を頂点に、住友から土地を借りて借家経営を行った家主、さらには家主から住戸1戸ずつを借りる「本所帯」、その1戸のうち二階などを間借りした「同居所帯」という形で、幾重にも重層する関係があったのです。なお、家主は、1か月数百円の、当時としては高収入を得ており、家屋も広く、上水道や井戸、便所も専用のものがありました。月収50円代の借家人たちとの格差は、歴然だったのです。

八十軒長屋の階層構造(出典:佐賀朝『近代大阪の都市社会構造』、日本経済評論社)

 さて、長屋住民の職業は、どうだったのでしょうか。

 長屋の世帯主は、じつは長町以来の伝統があって、屑物(くずもの)の収集に関する職業が多かったのですが、世帯員―つまり世帯主の子供―の世代は、付近の町工場などで働く場合が多く、中には熟練労働者もいました。つまり世代を交代する中で、日雇い・屑拾いなどの伝統的な貧困層から、近代的な労働者へと上昇していく傾向が読み取れるのです。

 じつは、次回、第15回の授業で述べるように、この八十軒長屋をはじめとする日本橋地域の裏長屋群は、大阪市による不良住宅地区の改良事業の対象とされます。それは、この地域のありようが貧困と格差に象徴される都市社会問題の現れと見られたからですが、他方で、この地域の住民は、近代的な産業に欠かせない労働力を提供するとしても見られていたと考えられるのです。

まとめ

 以上のように、大阪の工業化の影には、家族とともに都市周縁部の長屋で、ひしめくように暮らし、貧困にあえぎながらも、巨大都市大阪の日々の生産を支えた庶民の歴史があったのです。そこには、19世紀末以来、新たに大阪市に流入し、貧困と格差という社会矛盾を受けとめながら、たくましく生きた本当の庶民の姿とその軌跡を垣間見ることができるでしょう。