Overview

Greetings from the Dean of the Graduate School/ Faculty of Literature and Human Sciences

kobayashidean

Naoki Kobayashi, Dean of the Graduate School of Literature and Human Sciences

Welcome to the website of the Graduate School of Literature and Human Sciences, Osaka City University!

Osaka City University is a well-established university with a history originating in the 19th century. The Faculty of Literature and Human Sciences was founded in 1953 after originally being established as the Faculty of Law in 1949 in the aftermath of WWII. The Graduate School of Literature and Human Sciences was also established in the same year. Since then, we have engaged in academic pursuits in various fields related to humanity, human languages, cultures, history, and society for over 60 years.

And now, the Graduate School of Literature and Human Sciences is opening a new page in its history. Corresponding with the opening of the Department of Cultural Management in 2019 under the Faculty of Literature and Human Sciences – in addition to existing departments, i.e. the Department of Philosophy and History, the Department of Human Behavioral Sciences, and the Department of Language and Culture – the Graduate School of Literature and Human Sciences started offering our new course structure comprising of 16 academic fields (courses) in the 4 departments beginning in the academic year 2020.

While we have respected the importance of traditional and basic studies and at the same time have explored interdisciplinary and applied fields of academic studies to fulfill the needs of the times and of society, the new course structure now allows us to provide more enriched education and research environments in both fundamental and applied fields of academia.

In the context of the advancement of today’s globalization, the fields of studies collectively referred to as “literature” and “human sciences” are on the backfoot of general trends in favor of practical sciences and may often be regarded as unimportant. In reality, however, it is no exaggeration to say that versatile competencies that we can acquire through respective academic approaches in, for instance, studying various languages, discussing cultures and the history of different regions, and observing human behaviors constitute “abilities to understand others.” I believe such abilities are essential for the development of global human resources.

We look forward to engaging in our past and new studies with you.